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With the insanity of New Jersey’s doomsday weather this week (first a tropical storm, then a blizzard…where are the locusts?) comes a slew of exciting arts opportunities this weekend!  These next couple of weekends before Thanksgiving have a multitude of great shows and concerts in store, nearly all of which you can attend for free with your Student Events Eligible pass (a.k.a. a simple swipe of your prox).  Don’t delay–these babies are sure to sell out fast!

  • Tonight, the Princeton Katzenjammers present a one-night-only musical extravaganza of co-ed a cappella.  If their great vocalizing isn’t enough to tempt you, the night’s also featuring a performance by former KJ Ben Taub ’14, fresh from his stint on NBC’s  The Voice.  11pm Thursday night, Theatre Intime.  Click here for more.
  • This weekend only, the Princeton University Players present Nine, a sexy musical directed by sophomore Eamon Foley ’15.  Song, dance, leggy ladies with great pipes: who could ask for more?  Thursday-Saturday at 8pm, Saturday at 2pm in the Matthews Acting Studio, 185 Nassau Street.  Click here for more.
  • You won’t want to miss eXpressions Dance Company‘s electrifying fall show, Uprising.  Tickets go fast for this one-weekend event, so get ‘em while you can!  Thursday-Saturday at 8pm in the Frist Film and Performance Theater.  Click here for more.
  • This weekend and next, Theatre Intime presents the hair-rasing comic thriller Wait Until Dark, directed by sophomore Mike Pinsky ’15.  8pm Thursday-Saturday for two weekends in Theatre Intime, with a 2pm matinee next Saturday (11/17).  Click here for more.
  • All-Nighter with David Drew, Princeton’s only live late-night talk show, presents its second episode at 11pm this Friday in Frist.  The first show was a huge hit, so it’s definitely worth a watch!  Featuring guests Bruce Easop ’13 (USG president), Professor Sam Wang (election predictor extraordinaire), and singer-Songwriter Mark Watter ’14.  Click here for more.
  • The Lewis Center for the Arts’ Program in Theater collaborates with the Department of Music to present its fall show extravaganza, Der Bourgeois Bigwig.  Chock full of hilarious hijinks from a talented team of actors, music from the University Orchestra, and stunning costumes and set, it’s a must-see.  Friday and Saturday at 8pm; next Thursday-Saturday at 8pm (11/9-10 and 11/15-17). Berlind Theater and McCarter Theater Center (across from the Dinky).  Click here for more.
  • This Friday only, the Princeton Tigressions present a great night of female a cappella at Richardson Auditorium for their biannual Jam.  It also features guest performances from BAC Dance and the Princeton Footnotes (male a cappella).  A terrific night of music and dance in a beautiful venue!  Click here for more.
  • This weekend only, Princeton Chinese Theatre presents Rhinoceros in Love, directed by Jianfei Chen ’15 and Liukun Wu ’15.  Thursday-Saturday at 8pm, with a 2pm Saturday matinee, in Whitman College’s Class of 1970 Theatre.  Click here for more.
  • As you plan your weekend’s viewing schedule, remember to snag tickets for the Princeton Triangle Club‘s newest show, Tree’s Company: Forest’s a Crowd!, which will run next Friday and Saturday at 8pm with a Sunday matinee (11/16-18).  It’s in the Matthews Theater at McCarter (the big one at the top of the hill), and tickets sell out fast, so get on it!  Click here for more. 
172812_1252298911090_1338030009_31011204_7157827_oMidterms are upon us! Heaven forbid! If you can bear to drag yourself out of your studying coma (or you can’t even bear to start work), these events are the perfect shortcut to study-free bliss, if only for a couple of hours:
  • Terrace has some great shows in store this weekend: from French hip hop to “chillwave’s new Top Gun” Com Truise (a Princeton-based group), it’s looking to be a great weekend for live music.  Sets usually start at around midnight.
  • If you’re looking for some relaxing down time before you hit the Street (or, alas, the books), check out the University Modal Ensemble at Café Viv tonight.  They’ll be playing from 11:30pm-1am, and it’s a fairly casual affair–the perfect study break if you’re chained to a desk in McGraw.
  • The Princeton University Orchestra has an innovative concert in the works this weekend, including the world premiere of an electric guitar concerto (yes, you heard that right) from graduate student Mark Dancigers.  It also features concertos from violinist Yoon Won Song and flutist Jessica Anastasio, who was recently accepted into Rice University’s prestigious Shepherd School of Music for graduate study.  Concerts Friday and Saturday, 8pm in Richardson Auditorium at Alexander Hall. Tickets $8, student events eligible.  To read more about Anastasio, Dancigers, and Song, click here (Warning: feelings of supreme inadequacy might ensue. These three are pretty darn spectacular).181983_10150098492538661_653008660_6340632_4922082_n
  • Quipfire’s March shows at Theatre Intime are sure to sell out quickly–nothing cleanses the soul and eases the mind like laughing your brains out, and this weekend is one of the group’s most popular events of the year.  10:30pm at Intime, tickets $5 at the door–but buying tickets ahead at Frist is highly recommended.
  • Theater options abound this weekend: if you’re looking for something short and sweet (it clocks in at just over an hour, perfect for our pre-midterms attention spans), definitely check out the Student Playwrights Festival at Theatre Intime.  The festival features three new pieces that were written and directed by underclassmen, and it’s only up this one weekend, so don’t miss out!  Thursday-Saturday at 8pm in Theatre Intime.  It’s also not too late to catch Carousel at the Frist Film and Performance Theatre or Much Ado About Nothing in Whitman; both have been getting great word of mouth, and their casts are incredible.  Both run Thursday-Saturday at 8pm with 2pm matinees on March 5–Carousel’s matinee will feature a post-show talkback with theater professors Jill Dolan and Stacy Wolf that’s sure to be a fascinating watch.  Tickets for all three shows are $8; student events eligible.
  • There’s nothing like Harry, Hermione and the rest of the gang to help alleviate midterms stress (even if watching them makes you want to transfer to Oxford): Frist’s showing Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 1 at midnight on Saturday in the Film and Performance Theatre, no tickets required.
Illyria Poster Final PKMNWelcome back to campus, everybody! This weekend is one of the term’s busiest for arts events–with great theater, music, and dance everywhere you turn, the hardest thing will be choosing which performances to see!  Here’s our cheat sheet for what’s in store:
  • This is Our Youth, a story of Upper-East-Side twentysomethings in the 1980s, produced by Theatre Intime and directed by Chris Ghaffari ’12. November 11-13 and 18-20, Theatre Intime. To watch the trailer, click here. Tickets $8, student events eligible.
  • Illyria, a musical adaptation of Twelfth Night by Pete Mills ’95 and Cara Reichel ’96, co-produced by the Princeton University Players and Princeton Shakespeare Company (and directed by yours truly!).   November 11-13 at 8pm, 13-14 at 2pm, Matthews Acting Studio at the Lewis Center for the Arts. Tickets $8, student events eligible.
The cast from Theatre Intime's "This Is Our Youth"

The cast from Theatre Intime's "This Is Our Youth"

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(source: www.princeton.edu/~compose)

Prefrosh weekend is upon us! And for those of us whose hearts are too hard to be warmed by naïve little ’14ers, the upshot of the impending insanity is it brings a host of arts events to campus this weekend. While they’re designed to court impressionable newbies, these events also provide exciting entertainment (we promise!) for the more jaded upperclassmen.

First up: the spring concert from Princeton’s Undergraduate Composers Collective, which is happening at 8:30pm tonight in the Rocky Common Room. Founded in 2007 by Todd Kramer ’11 and Nick DiBerardino ’11, the Composers Collective holds weekly workshops where student composers can test out their pieces and swap ideas.

For people who associate modern music with atonal screeches and bangs, the Collective offers a refreshing surprise. “The concerts are a great way for people to find out what they like, see what their friends are up to, and learn that ‘contemporary music’ does not always mean ear-splitting dissonances that seem to go on forever,” says Kramer, a graduate of the Juilliard School’s Pre-College Program.” People are often surprised to discover that most of our composers write tonal music.”

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